Hoonah: A commercial documentary project for Allied Feather & Down. In December 2016, I was asked by Allied Feather & Down to create an editorial style photo essay on a cold and isolated place for their publication "Into the Cold". The project resulted in a series of photos and an essay for print as well as a social media takeover during the release of the publication.

 

HOONAH

"Here, Elders have tales as tall as the icebergs that used to haunt the fisherman out at sea. Ice flipping and turning without warning, the waters were a dangerous place to be 50 years ago. Full of salmon, halibut, octopus, seals, crabs, and sea otters, the waters were necessary for life, and so the men braved the icy seas. The icebergs have melted, but the winds have stayed just as fierce and unpredictable.

"There used to be more snow. Tales wisp across the streets of mid-November weddings in which the bride had to walk through a snow tunnel to her own wedding. Tales of bounties of berries that you had to fight the bears to get to, now less plentiful since the snow has become less of an annual visitor. (Though the bears remain here in the densest population in the world.)

"Chichagof Island sits along the Icy Strait, and Hoonah, right on the edge of the island. The Tlingit Native Americans have been here for an estimated 14,500 years. Kicked out of Glacier Bay the first time because the glacier Costine called to destroy her own tribe thousands of years ago, and then again more recently by the National Park service. The Tlingit have been between here and there, living off the land and sea as the waters remain just as vital for life as they ever have been. Resilient to the harsh conditions that has made Alaska the illusive badlands it has grown the reputation to be, those willing to stay and brave the storm are rewarded with an isolated paradise ripe for sustainable living.

"The Elders are teaching the younger generations of all the things that can be consumed and has a purpose. The goal is to build a strong community to help keep tradition; coming together to stay isolated from commercial dependance. As a return for the knowledge, the youth harvest deer and gift it to the Elders to give them food for the upcoming winter months.

"Hoonah is a special place. With the fog coming out of the hills, reminiscent of smoke from long ago, the harsh landscape has an accompanying story of resilience to the conditions. Totems have stories of rising out of creeks as protective forces over the people. The history is rich. The culture struggling to stay alive amongst modern progression. High schoolers learn the native Tlingit language, veterans who have gone off to war have come home to Hoonah and perform dances and ceremonies. The Elders say the children now speak the language better and sing louder than they do.

"This small town has roads that end, forcing you onto a boat or plane to leave. Within this isolation, however, there is a greater community. A community that comprises of many other small villages in Southeast Alaska, working together to preserve culture, with a rich spoken database of where to hunt and what can be harvested. Programs are being developed to communicate with one another clearer and also to become completely sustainable by using strictly renewable resources. There is hope that with this, the appreciation for the land and the sea can continue, and the community can come together to continue to stay isolated just a bit longer." -Christine Armbruster

"Into the Cold" a bi-annual publication for Allied Feather & Down.

"Into the Cold" a bi-annual publication for Allied Feather & Down.

Shawn Anthony. When I met him he told me he carries a bear whistle just incase. I asked if he ever had to use it. He responded by telling me he had to use it once while picking strawberries with his grandmother. He then told me about how kids sometimes aren't allowed to go out at night because of the bears. Bonzi was a boy he knew who got mauled by a bear right in the middle of town. Happens all the time. Hoonah is on Chichagof Island, home to the densest brown bear population in the world. I asked two different people if they hunted bears and got two answers. The first was no, because if you shoot a bear for sport, there will be a time when you and the bear meet again, and only the souls will know who should survive. The second no I received was because when you cut open a bear and lie it on his back, he looks just like a human.

Shawn Anthony. When I met him he told me he carries a bear whistle just incase. I asked if he ever had to use it. He responded by telling me he had to use it once while picking strawberries with his grandmother. He then told me about how kids sometimes aren't allowed to go out at night because of the bears. Bonzi was a boy he knew who got mauled by a bear right in the middle of town. Happens all the time. Hoonah is on Chichagof Island, home to the densest brown bear population in the world. I asked two different people if they hunted bears and got two answers. The first was no, because if you shoot a bear for sport, there will be a time when you and the bear meet again, and only the souls will know who should survive. The second no I received was because when you cut open a bear and lie it on his back, he looks just like a human.

Fishing with Raino. Went out looking for King Salmon, instead got quite a bit of rain and a lot of stories and history of the land.

Fishing with Raino. Went out looking for King Salmon, instead got quite a bit of rain and a lot of stories and history of the land.

Sign at the Senior Center looking for more traditional Alaskan food for donation. Acceptable donations include: most wild game meat, fish, seafood, unfermented maktak and seal meat, plants (including fiddlehead and sourdock), berries, wild mushroom and eggs. Unacceptable donations include: fox, polar bear, bear, and walrus, seal and whale oils, fermented game meat, smoked or dried or canned seafood, and molluscan shellfish.

Sign at the Senior Center looking for more traditional Alaskan food for donation. Acceptable donations include: most wild game meat, fish, seafood, unfermented maktak and seal meat, plants (including fiddlehead and sourdock), berries, wild mushroom and eggs. Unacceptable donations include: fox, polar bear, bear, and walrus, seal and whale oils, fermented game meat, smoked or dried or canned seafood, and molluscan shellfish.

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Hoonah, Alaska.

Hoonah, Alaska.

Byron Rudolph. He told me of icebergs that used to be all over the Icy Straight and what a dangerous place it was for fisherman. That was in the 1960s. Since then, they have all melted.

Byron Rudolph. He told me of icebergs that used to be all over the Icy Straight and what a dangerous place it was for fisherman. That was in the 1960s. Since then, they have all melted.

Until the 80s there was no public waste removal system. There was no need for it. When the industries began to come to Hoonah, so did the excess waste, material goods, and a need for a place to dispose of everything.

Until the 80s there was no public waste removal system. There was no need for it. When the industries began to come to Hoonah, so did the excess waste, material goods, and a need for a place to dispose of everything.

Mail delivery thanks to the bush pilots of Alaska Sea Planes. This little plane is also one of two ways to access Hoonah. It is a 30 minute plane ride from Juneau, or a 12 hour ferry ride.

Mail delivery thanks to the bush pilots of Alaska Sea Planes. This little plane is also one of two ways to access Hoonah. It is a 30 minute plane ride from Juneau, or a 12 hour ferry ride.

The biggest thanks in the world goes out to the town of Hoonah, the wonderful people who live there who not only let me photograph them, but invited me into their homes to stay or for meals or just to chat. Another big thanks out to the Senior Center who let me sit and have lunch with them daily while they told me stories. Also thank you to those who I talked to before arriving who were full of encouragement and enthusiasm for the project. And lastly to Allied Feather & Down who trusted me in the first place to do a project with no guidelines.